Taking a metro to the airport? To make the A line longer would take 11 years; five new stations would cost 27 billion crowns

//Taking a metro to the airport? To make the A line longer would take 11 years; five new stations would cost 27 billion crowns

Taking a metro to the airport? To make the A line longer would take 11 years; five new stations would cost 27 billion crowns

To make the A line longer and stretch all the way to the airport would be a blessing for many travellers. The construction of this segment would cost up to 27 billion. At least that’s what the analysis of the city transport company made by Metroproject says. The document also includes a possible linkage of Motol and Zličín stations.

The airport segment would have, according to this analysis, five new stations and would measure 6.86 km. The journey from Můstek to the airport would take 25 minutes. The line would include new stations – Bílá Hora, Dědina, Dlouhá Míle, Staré Letiště and Václav Havel airport. The two stations furthest away would be Bílá Hora and Dědina, with 2.16 km separating them. The stations closest together would be Dědina and Dlouhá Míle, with a mere 0.88 km separating them.

Václav Havel airport station would be built 21 metres underground, and it would have an “island” platform, so that the train would be entered from a platform in between the tracks from both directions, as is common with other Prague stations. The station wouldn’t provide travel options just to travellers, but to the whole surrounding area if a developer builds any new houses or flats there. The station at Dlouhá Míle is devised in such a way that it would work together with the train station in its vicinity. “The significance of this connection stems from the possibility of creating a quality transport terminal,” states the analysis. The station could be used as the terminus station for most long-distance buses that are providing transport options to people living around Prague. The station should be built at a depth of 33 metres. The parking lot P+R would be preserved.

The Dědina station would be located to the northwest of the crossing of Drnovská and Vlastina streets and the exit from the station should point directly to the Dědina residential area. The station would still have to be planned to the detail, together with Václav Havel Airport station and Douhá Míle station, states the material.

Under Ruzyně, the line should be built a bit deeper for the sake of stability, and this would also influence the Bílá Hora station that would be built at a depth of 44.4 metres. The centre of this station should be located in the middle of the cross section of Karlovarská, K Motolu and Thurnova streets.

In between Nemocnice Motol and Bílá Hora stations, the line should be built in such a way that would allow for subsequent construction of a line to Řepy and to Zličín, where the line would connect to the B line.

6.5 years of preparations

Out of the planned 11 years of construction, the preparations would take 6.5 years. The preparation would include getting all the necessary documents and legal work. The construction would take an additional 4.5 years. The construction wouldn’t require any principal change to the territorial plan.

There have been talks about making the A line reach all the way to the Airport. Originally, the line should have led from Dejvická to the airport, but the city decided to lead it to Motol and to end it there. The station began operation three years ago and cost 20 billion crowns.

Prague is also considering building another segment of the metro C line to Čakovice, which would take 12 years and would cost 16 billion crowns. The line would be three stations and 3.5 km longer.

By | 2018-04-06T22:16:41+00:00 April 5th, 2018|News|Comments Off on Taking a metro to the airport? To make the A line longer would take 11 years; five new stations would cost 27 billion crowns

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